Shopping Cart

No products in the cart.

Month October 2018

In The Garden: March – June

map of aussie
March: Brussels sprouts (seedling tray), broad beans, beetroot, broccoli (seedling tray), cabbage (seedling tray), carrot, chives, coriander, daikon, endive, fennel, kale, kohlrabi, leeks, lettuce, Mizuna, mustard greens, pak choy/ bok choy, radish, rocket, shallots (plant bulbs), silverbeet, turnips.

Eating Insects

che
As superfood fads go, the movement towards eating insects has a lot of hype, but is less commonly adopted. An untapped source of protein, high in amino acids, wildly abundant, easy to grow, with a tiny ecological footprint—the sales pitch sounds great to most of us until we’re presented with a dish of mealworms.

Biogas: Creating Power From Waste

biogas
There is a simple way to make your own renewable energy at home and use it for cooking, heating and lighting. It’s called Biogas, and the concept is – add your kitchen scraps or animal manures to a large tank called a ‘digester’ and the anaerobic bacteria that live in the tank will breakdown or ‘digest’ these wastes and convert them to methane gas.

Book Reviews

book
Milkwood have done it again. Everything they do has equal parts style and substance and this book has both in spades (excuse the pun). Rather than trying to do what a lot of gardening/ permaculture books do and try to cover everything in one book, Kirsten and Nick have chosen a few areas of expertise and explored them in-depth.

Kids’ Patch

kids-patch
We love to see our little Pip fans and we’d like big kids to be in Pip magazine too. So if there are big kids out there doing great things in the garden (come on tweens and teens!), get out your selfie sticks and show us what you’re up to.

The Soil Food Web: The Life Beneath Our Feet

soil
As we tread upon our soil, plant into it and harvest from it, it’s hard to imagine the myriad of creatures that live within it. Teeming with life, the sheer number and diversity of creatures in our soil is mind-boggling, and these creatures are crucial to the health and vitality of our soil. This interdependent circle of life is known as the soil food web.

Editorial

Robyn Rosenfeldt
The earth we walk on is made up of a world of bacteria and other microscopic life, most of which are invisible to the naked eye, but without them we have nothing. It is this complex soil food web that makes our soil alive and able to give life to all things. The more fungi, bacteria and other microbes we have in our soil, the more nutrients can be taken up by the plants we grow and the food we eat, which in turn adds to the good microbes and bacteria in our bodies, building our health and nutrition.