Book Reviews

EAT LIKE A FISH: MY ADVENTURES AS A FISHERMAN TURNED RESTORATIVE OCEAN FARMER

By Bren Smith (Alfred A. Knopf 2019)

Review by Emily Stokes

This is an important book for fishermen, ocean lovers, seafood eaters, environmentalists; in fact, everyone inhabiting the Earth. The oceans are in peril. Seafood stocks are decimated. Bren Smith offers a compelling solution for cleaning up the oceans, growing enough food for a burgeoning global population and capturing enough carbon to make a difference in a climatechanging world – by growing seaweed and bivalves in a vertical ocean farm.

The book begins as a rollicking tale of Bren’s youth in Newfoundland and as a commercial fisherman in the Bering Sea, moving to a slow but dramatic evolution into his awareness of the oceans’ problems. He shares his revelation that seaweed is a nutritious, delicious, versatile superfood and writes about his creation of vertical ocean farms to grow oysters, mussels, clams and sea ‘vegetables’.

Bren’s account of this often painful and heart-wrenching process, littered with mega-storms, dodgy New York financiers and the world’s best chefs, ends up overwhelmingly positive and will make you want to give up your day job and become a restorative ocean farmer too.

COOKING WITH THE OLDEST FOODS ON EARTH, AUSTRALIAN NATIVE FOODS, RECIPES AND SOURCES

By John Newton (New South Publishing 2019)

Review by Robyn Rosenfeldt

This is a companion book to the award-winning, Oldest Foods on Earth. This latest book shares how to actually prepare a collection of Australian native foods. When Europeans arrived in this country, they chose to ignore most of the foods that the Indigenous people were eating for thousands of years. Instead, they focused on importing plants and animals that weren’t suited to our climate. John Newton poses the question, why not use the plants and animals that Aboriginal people were eating for 50,000 years?

This book introduces some of the most popular and easily accessible food varieties, with information about nutritional values, how to prepare them and a few choice recipes for each. John looks at plants, seafood, native animals and grains. For those wanting to include native foods in their diet, this book is a great starting point.

THE COMMONS: A YEAR OF GROWING, COOKING AND EATING ON FAT PIG FARM

By Matthew Evans (Hardie Grant Publishing 2019)

Review by Emily Stokes

If you enjoyed the latest Gourmet Farmer TV series, then you’ll love Matthew Evans’ latest cookbook. Ramble across paddocks, past bursting gardens and through the apple orchard as Matthew takes you on a tour of his Tamanian property, Fat Pig Farm. If you haven’t watched the latest TV series yet, then you must – there are plenty of permaculture references!

In this book, Matthew reveals all that he and partner, Sadie, grow and produce on the farm; including fresh cows’ milk, asparagus, strawberries, olives and grass-fed pork and beef, offering readers a peek into their farm life, with all its joys and challenges. Then he takes us into their kitchen, where the homegrown food is transformed with delicious recipes like goat pie with lard yoghurt pastry and beef brisket with mustard and beer.

The book is divided into four seasons on the farm, each beautifully photographed and packed with recipes full of simple produce you will most likely have on hand, yet with uncommon flavour and flair. What shines through is Matthew and Sadie’s long-term vision of sustainably growing and eating quality food and celebrating all that they and their community have in common.

GROWING GOOD FOOD, A CITIZEN’S GUIDE TO BACKYARD CARBON FARMING

By Acadia Tucker (Stone Pier Press 2019)

Review by Robyn Rosenfeldt

Growing Good Food is a nuts-and-bolts guide about how to start regenerative food-growing practices and help store carbon in the soil. It clearly explains the science behind how soil stores carbon and how to do it in your own backyard. This book is an important read for any backyard grower who wants to make a positive impact on the climate in their own patch of dirt.

Acadia starts with the big picture, looking at why we, as individuals, need to store carbon in the soil. Then she explains the science behind how plants and soil sequester carbon, providing clear instructions about how we can store more carbon in our own vegetable patch and gardens. Acadia also shares her choice of perennial and annual fruits and vegetables that are carbon-friendly, and information about how to grow them while improving your soil.

Author

Leave a Reply

Shopping Cart

No products in the cart.

Powered By MemberPress WooCommerce Plus Integration

Notice: Undefined offset: 0 in /home/pipmagaz/grow.pipmagazine.com.au/wp-content/plugins/memberpress-woocommerce-plus/core/memberpress-woocommerce-plus.class.php(1) : eval()'d code on line 1863