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Kids’ Patch

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FINNY, 16MTHS, ADELAIDE, SA
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DORIAN, 8 YRS, MELBOURNE, VIC
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HATTIE, 5YRS, HUON VALLEY, TAS

This issue’s winner is Dorian from Melbourne, for this photo with his goaty pal. Congratulations Dorian! You receive a download of Grow Do It, the latest album from Formidable Vegetable Sound System.

Parents, send in photos of your kids in the garden or with their homegrown produce. Not only will they feature in the Kids’ Patch page, but you’ll be in the running to win a copy of Listen to the Land. Stories and Songs for Children by Annie Bryant. This CD includes seven songs and six audio stories about growing food, living on the land, caring for the bush and bees, and listening to Mother Earth.

To enter simply send the photo with the name, age and address of your child to maude@pipmagazine.com.au

SHOW US YOUR GARDEN – EDEN PRIMARY SCHOOL (EDEN, NSW)

Interview with Joey Wilson, Shannon Strickland and Angus Riddle

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Describe your garden: Colourful, beautiful, pretty, yum. It has paths, stakes and a compost patch.

Produce grown: Bananas, chillies, pumpkin, corn, tomatoes, chokos, peas, beans.

What do you do with the produce? Sell it to a local cafe, eat it, make soup, take it home, share it with the other classes.

Time spent in your garden? 1 hour a week.

Favourite activites: Getting hands dirty, planting and eating.

Favourite thing to grow: Everything we grow, but especially bananas, pumpkins, corn and beans.

HOW TO MAKE A BEAN POLE TEEPEE

Words and photos by Jean Van’t Hul of the Artful Parent

MATERIALS

  • Bamboo or wood poles, 6–10 feet tall
  • Twine or string
  • Soil amendments if necessary
  • Pole bean seeds
  • Annual climbing bean or flower seeds

INSTRUCTIONS

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Step 1. Determine teepee size and location. Loosely assemble the bamboo poles in the teepee shape (without tying them yet). If you’re okay with the size and location, mark the teepee footprint with string, a garden hose or a line of flour. Move the teepee poles out of the way.

Step 2. Remove the sod from the horseshoe-shaped teepee footprint and amend the soil for planting. I like to dig in compost or composted cow manure to add nutrients.

Step 3. Next, assemble your teepee poles, pushing the bottom ends into the amended soil, tying the top ends together.

Step 4. Now add twine to the bamboo pole framework. Tie off the end of your twine at the top of one of the poles and, working your way around and down the teepee, create a trellis system for the pole beans to grow up.

Step 5. Pull the twine tautly from one pole to the next, wrap it around that pole, then pull it tightly over to the next pole, etc. When you reach the doorway, reverse direction back around the teepee, until the entire teepee (except for the door) is covered with a network of twine. The final stretch of twine should be close enough to the ground that the baby bean seedlings will be able to reach their climbing support without too much problem.

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Step 6. Finally, plant your bean seeds! Follow the directions on your seed packet. General directions for planting beans are: after danger of frost has passed, plant seeds 2 cm deep and about 10 cm apart. Cover with soil, pat down firmly, and water well.

Step 7. You can also add other seeds or seedlings at this time, either other annual vines that will climb up the teepee, or other low-growing annuals, such as marigolds or nasturtiums, that will form a visual base to the teepee. The beans should sprout after about a week.

Step 8. Keep the bean seedlings well-watered and help guide them to the base of the teepee if they seem to need it. Progress may seem slow at first, but once they get going you’ll be surprised at how quickly the beans cover your teepee structure.

Step 9. Use the bean pole teepee as a play area, fort, or reading nook at any stage of bean growth.

Step 10. Once your bean plants start producing beans (after about 60 days), pick them! Keep the beans picked so that the plants continue to produce them.

Step 11. When your beans are finished for the season, you can either pull down the entire structure or clip the twine and bean plants off the teepee framework and toss them in the compost. Now that you know how to make a bean pole teepee, are you going to do it? It’s really quite easy and very rewarding!

www.artfulparent.com

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