Kids’ Patch

We love seeing what kids are growing with their families in their gardens, so snap and email us an image of what you’re harvesting at the moment. Send the photo to editorial@ pipmagazine.com.au – and you might even pick up a snazzy prize! This issue’s winner is five-year-old Ilona Arnott from Kalaru, NSW.
kids-patch

We love seeing what kids are growing with their families in their gardens, so snap and email us an image of what you’re harvesting at the moment. Send the photo to editorial@ pipmagazine.com.au – and you might even pick up a snazzy prize! This issue’s winner is five-year-old Ilona Arnott from Kalaru, NSW.

ilona
Ilona Arnott (5 years), Kalaru, NSW

Show Us Your Garden

Hamilton Public School’s Green Team

kids

What tips can you share?

Magnus: Once you have some plants, you can get the sees and grow more plants.

Bethany: It’s easy to make slug traps with a container, bread and water.

What’s your favourite plant to grow and harvest?

Rio: Sweet potato, because I like digging them up. I thought they were going to be small but they were actually ginormous!

produce

Theo: Cabbage, because it’s very yummy.

What is the most exciting thing about being in the Green Team?

Lachie: I like digging up sweet potatoes. It is like digging up treasure!

Anna: I get to see the tadpoles.

Who has inspired your interest in gardening?

kids-garden

Layla: My great nanna Dot. I helped her plant some things.

Harrison: My grandma. She has strawberries and she used to have tomatoes.

What’s great about being part of the team?

Jemima: Gardening is good because it gives you food.

Olivia: Selling in the stall because I get to serve people.

Make Your Own Flower-Stamped Tote

By Emily Gray, Permaculture South Australia & Freyja Burdon

Print your own bespoke totes

WHAT YOU’LL NEED

A collection of flowers and leaves

2 calico tote bags

A hammer

A sheet of baking paper

An iron

DIRECTIONS

  1. Firstly, line the inside of your bags with baking paper to prevent the dyes seeping through, and flatten on a table.
  2. Next, take your flowers and leaves and arrange them in a pattern or randomly on one of the bags.
  3. Carefully place your second bag on top of the first and flatten out before using the hammer to hit your laid-out flowers and leaves – just hard enough for them to release their colours.
  4. Using one hand to keep the top bag in place, peel back one edge of the top bag and check if you’re happy with the result. You may need to do it a few times before removing the bag.
  5. Once you’re happy, remove the paper and set aside, and allow both bags to dry for a couple of hours.
  6. Once dry, place the baking paper over your patterns and iron them with a warm to hot iron to help set the colour. The natural dye isn’t colourfast, so try not to get the bags wet and minimise washing.

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