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Permaculture Around The World

International Projects

www.permacultureeducationinstitute.org

PERMACULTURE LAND CENTRE

www.organiclea.org.uk

PERMACULTURE LAND CENTRE
Photo Courtesy Of The Projects

Organiclea is a community farm at the northern edge of London in the Lea Valley next to the ancient woodland Epping Forest which, incredibly, has been continuously forested since neolithic times. The 12-acre farm started in 2008 and is run as a cooperative. Leased from Waltham Forest Council, they’re working together to develop and implement a food strategy by helping local schools create gardening programs.

With a focus on diverse plantings, rainwater harvesting, composting toilets, recycling, food sovereignty and more, the project is recognised as a Permaculture Association Land Project, a national network of model demonstration sites across the UK.

The farm hosts a forest school, organises permaculture design courses, practical workshops and open days, as well as creating a space for people to come and learn and work for positive change in rewilding the area and working towards food sovereignty. The cooperative runs a food box scheme, a farm shop and nursery.

MAY PROJECT GARDENS

www.mayproject.org

MAY PROJECT GARDENS
Photo Courtesy Of The Projects

May Project Gardens is an award-winning grassroots project focusing on empowering the disempowered and creating affordable, shared solutions so people can live sustainably.

In 2007, co-founder Ian Solomon-Kawall (pictured) was grieving the loss of his mother when he decided to turn her large London-based council-house garden into a community space for healing. Through his own grief, he wanted to help others who were experiencing personal, social or financial hardship in the city.

Because nature is central to everything it does, the permaculture-designed garden includes a herb spiral, vegetable beds, ponds, a forest garden, water collection, a composting toilet and cob oven – there’s even an insulated treehouse and an outdoor classroom.

A recent program engages urban youth with nature through Hip Hop culture that cuts across diverse language and cultural backgrounds. With acclaimed artists, it runs ‘Come We Grow’ events and even hosts ‘Team Away’ days focusing on mental health and wellbeing as people readjust to returning to work after the lockdowns.

The garden is open every week and welcomes people to relax, reconnect, learn or just disconnect from the bustling city.

EARTHSEED PERMACULTURE FARM

www.earthseedfarm.org

EARTHSEED PERMACULTURE FARM
Photo Courtesy Of The Projects

EARTHseed is the first Afro-indigenous and allblack owned retreat-cum-education centre and permaculture farm in Sonoma County, California.

Established earlier this year by permaculture educator-activist Pandora Thomas, creator of the Black Permaculture Network, it connects Afroindigenous people together through permaculture, acroecology, natural living and earth care.

After raising US$2.7 million (AUD$3.76m) and having sought the blessing of the traditional custodians of the land, the organic 14-acre solarpowered orchard opened in March 2021.

As well as already establishing a permaculture farming system, they are setting the farm up as a respite and earth-centred relaxation space for the community – a place to reconnect with Afro-Indigenous principles and practices.

The EARTHseed community grows a variety of apples, pears, persimmons, plums, pluots, guavas and berries. Together the stewards and volunteers are learning how to care for wild areas, apply resilient regenerative approaches to managing the centre and the farm. The farm is open by appointment.

REFUGEE PERMACULTURE EDUCATION GARDENS

www.permayouth.org/africa/tanzania

REFUGEE PERMACULTURE EDUCATION GARDENS
Photo Courtesy Of The Projects

Permaculture gardens are beginning to sprout in refugee settlements in Tanzania and throughout many East African camps. The number of displaced people globally is rising at an alarming rate; one in 95 people on earth have fled their home. These diverse food gardens meet immediate needs, can be easily adapted to the local environment and culture, and are essential because humanitarian support can never stretch far enough.

In Nyarugusu refugee camp in the far east of Tanzania, a new permaculture education and demonstration garden program is growing in schools. It’s described by local officials as ‘life-saving’, as children come to school without having eaten. Three Tanzanian settlements shelter around 300,000 people, of which 55 percent are children, so finding ways to be more resilient is paramount which is why when permaculture lands, it ripples out fast. These gardens become places for the whole community – learning skills, exchanging seeds and growing out saplings for food forests and eco-restoration.

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