Permaculture Around The World

PERMACULTURE HELPING VULNERABLE CHILDREN–EKUKHANYENI RELIEF PROJECT, JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

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Photos courtesy of projects

The Ekukhanyeni Relief Project was started in 2003 to support vulnerable children in communities affected by severe poverty and HIV/ AIDS. Ekukhanyeni has created fifteen childcare centres, which incorporate permaculture gardens, to help care for over 600 children in informal settlements around Johannesburg.

Ekukhanyeni* identified that, because of poverty and illness, families were fragmented and parents had diminished capability to provide for their children’s wellbeing. They wanted to help the children, who had no access to good food, care or formal education. While some of the children involved are orphans, the parents of others go away to work all day and the children are left to fend for themselves in the slums.

Ekukhanyeni’s community-led approach creates centres to nourish and educate the children, but the food cultivated and services provided also support the communities around the centres.

* Ekukhanyeni means ‘home of light and hope’

See: www.ekukhanyeni.org

SIYAKHANA PERMACULTURE FOOD GARDEN, JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

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Photos courtesy of projects

The Siyakhana Permaculture Food Garden is one of Johannesburg’s best and longest-running urban-permaculture garden examples. The two hectare garden was started in 2005, and produces organic food and herbs for hundreds of disadvantaged people in the inner city. The garden has transformed an ugly urban area into a vibrant demonstration, education and urban permaculture research centre. It also demonstrates ecological technologies.

The garden is run by the Siyakhana Initiative for Ecological Health and Food Security – a collaboration of people from Johannesburg’s University of the Witwatersrand. The Initiative engages in research, consulting and programming in the areas of urban design, food security, nutrition, ecological health, capacity building and sustainable livelihoods. The model garden is the cornerstone project. See: www.siyakhana.org

SUNRISE FARM, NEPAL – UPDATE

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Photos courtesy of projects

In Pip3, I wrote about the twenty-five-year-old Sunrise Farm in Nepal, the working and educational farm near the centre of Kathmandu. Sunrise Farm was badly damaged by the huge earthquakes in mid-2015. There is a go fund me campaign to help rebuild the farm.

See: gofundme.com/wr2cn5y4

NATURE’S GIFT PERMACULTURE CENTRE, MALAWI

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Photos courtesy of projects

Nature’s Gift Permaculture Centre, based at the Kusamala Institute of Agriculture & Ecology in Malawi, was founded in 2009 as a demonstration and education centre, to show people how to address food security issues locally and sustainably, and meet the food and nutrition needs of the local community.

The Centre gardens – including a market garden and natural medicine garden – show how permaculture and agro-ecology can be applied in the Malawian context.

The market garden, first planted in 2010, now has over 120 beds, with twenty-five different crops in rotation. On what was once an equestrian training ground, the permaculture gardens produce seasonal, nutritious, organic and diverse vegetables and herbs, which are sold to restaurants, shops and locals through a vegetable box scheme. This scheme is Kusamala’s key project, and so popular that it has a permanent waiting list. It demonstrates the viability of permaculture methods, and provides great quality organic food for local people.

See: www.kusamala.org

THE LOCALISING FOOD PROJECT, NEW ZEALAND

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Photos courtesy of projects

The local food movement is taking off in New Zealand, with a diversity of projects flourishing on both the north and south islands. This has been fuelled, at least in part, by rising food costs and increased food insecurity resulting from natural disasters – earthquakes and floods.

In 2012–13 Earthcare Education Aotearoa embarked on a national ‘Localising Food Tour’ project, initiated by permaculture educator Robina McCurdy. A team of volunteers travelled the country connecting with people, and offering workshops, talks and other educational events to empower communities to create local food resilience and healthy, enriching local food cultures.

The tour helped communities to develop food resilience action plans, and to learn practical skills. Many new local food networks were formed, food gardens inspired, and seed banks formed. Along the way, the team filmed over 200 existing projects, and is now developing five documentaries to share the inspiration. They hope that viewers may adopt and adapt some of the New Zealand-based initiatives to build food resilience in other communities.

See: www.localisingfood.com

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